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The Best Talent is Finding Your Blue Ocean

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Confucius said, “Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

When you spend your day “in your blue ocean,” I mean doing something completely in tune with your authentic self, you feel as if you have found yourself. Being in your blue ocean is about feeling as if you “were born to swim in it”; it means more than doing something well: doing something that you love passionately.

To locate your blue ocean as the nexus where your natural aptitude meets your personal passion, to unlock your true potential, and bring meaning and purpose to your activities and to your life, you can follow a three-step process:

 

  • First, use introspection to uncover your strengths and weaknesses, and to identify what you truly love and what makes you happy. Meditation and mindfulness apps can help.
  • Next, examine your attitudes – the assumptions you’ve acquired about yourself over the years. Some of your old axioms may be wrong and should be questioned to find your blue ocean. For instance, many people mistakenly assume that they don’t have any distinctive talents or passions, while all of us do, as one-of-a-kind genetic mixture resulting from chance meetings between generations of ancestors. If you last saw Simon Sinek more than a year ago, give it a refresh.
  • Third, you have to look outside yourself to find the opportunities the world offers to live in your element, and look for new people to meet, new places to visit and new things to do. So, if you are not happy with what you're doing, stop complaining and take matters in hand now.

 

Finding your blue ocean means being open to new experiences and to exploring new paths and possibilities in yourself and in the world around you.

Choose your next job among those leaders and organizations committed to creating environments in which you can naturally do remarkable things. Everything else is boring and not worth to be lived, no excuses.