Your source of insights for a successful digital transformation.

How A Driving Simulator Helps You Win New Car Sales

Neosperience_Car_Driving_Simulator

Car manufacturers are starting to realize the importance of delivering engaging digital customer experiences across all digital devices and contexts: smartphones, tablets, computers and social networks.

A native digital experience that is more engaging and entertaining for users, regardless of the changing channels through which they interact with the car manufacturer and purchase.

A Car Driving Simulator, combined with a Digital Car Showroom, fits within the new range of Neosperience products for lead generation dedicated to the automotive market, enabling manufacturers and distributors to:

  • Improve the automotive customer journey with a win-win cooperation with the dealer who is empowered to attract customers and drive them to store in an unprecedented, very effective way.
  • Enhance and segment their customer base through inbound marketing activities, in-store events and road tests.
  • Attract and engage people in a real and entertaining experience, understanding their passions, interests, and driving them to store naturally, thanks to gamification and social networks integration, connecting with the immense Apple and Google App Store community.
  • Significantly enhance the lead generation process and increase conversion rate.

We at Neosperience are addressing this challenge via a set of Apple iOS, Google Android, Microsoft, Mac and Xbox compatible software products and services, which render a consistent experience across the different user's devices, delivering customer engagement that drives customers to truly experience the brand and be motivated to visit the car dealer.

Among the most innovative digital customer experiences, a Car Driving Simulator based on Neosperience can be used in engagement, entertainment and training scenarios, all connected with pre-existing CRM systems and sales processes.

 

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Branded Games Neosperience Apps Innovation Neosperience Facebook Automotive

The Sage Digital Customer Experience Archetype Shares Wisdom with You

expert

The sage’s central wisdom is an individual way of finding paradise.

The sage wants to be free to think and believes in mankind’s capacity to grow.

Sages include Socrates, Confucius and Oprah Winfrey. The sage also plays a part in all mystery stories. The sage may lack charisma and social graces but is associated with clear thinking. Sage brands include Vice President Al Gore, Harvard and Stanford Universities.

The sage archetype might provide an appropriate identity for your brand if you offer clients expertise or information, encourage them to think and support the quality of your product with hard data.

The sage:

  • Tells you that happiness is the result of education.
  • Helps you gain the consciousness to use your freedom and prosperity to enhance your life.
  • Looks for products that are adjuncts to learning or wisdom.
  • Likes to have all the relevant information needed to make informed decisions.

The Sage archetype provides a suitable identity for your brand and associated digital customer experience if:

  • It provides expertise or information to your customers.
  • It encourages customers or clients to think.
  • Your brand or product is based on a new scientific breakthrough or esoteric knowledge.
  • The quality of the brand is supported by science.
  • You are differentiating the product from others whose quality or performance is questionable by data.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Branding Archetypes

How To Utilize The Explorer Archetype in Digital Customer Experience

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Archetypal brand theory provides a sound methodology for establishing a memorable and compelling brand identity, one that can found relevant digital customer experiences, cross lifestyle and cultural boundaries, and translate into success that endures.

Among the 12 brand archetypes that we have studied, thanks to the deep analysis provided by by Margaret Mark and Carol S. Pearson, Joseph Campbell and, before them, Carl Jung, The Explorer brand archetype emphasize self over others and autonomy over belonging.

The story of the Explorer is characterized by science fiction movies such as Star Trek (“To Boldly Go Where No Man Has Gone Before”) and narratives about a transition from homeland, job or marriage. Books that exemplify the explorer archetype include F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Homer’s The Odyssey.

A brand or product resinates well with this archetype if it makes people feel free and is nonconformist.

The Explorer core desire is for the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world. His goal is to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life, while his greatest fear is getting trapped and conforming.

Explorers tend to see themselves as ahead of their time, that’s why they are particularly sensible to digital customer experience innovation. They are definitely willing to take tough stands for something they believe in; a shared value of individualism reinforces the Explorer archetype with an emphasis on discovering and expressing one’s own uniqueness.

Right-Time Personalization is for the Explorer more important then ever: when the Explorer archetype is active in your customers, their call is to explore the world and, in the process, to find themselves, so that they know who they are.

To market an Explorer brand effectively, it is best for you to empathize with the Explorer story from the inside, imagining, for example, what it’s like for your customer to feel trapped by his or her own life, to yearn for more excitement and adventure, to feel “bigger” than his life, as though it is constraining him.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: the shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Gal: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Neosperience Branding Archetypes

The Innocent Brand Archetype: Seeking Fulfillment in the Here and Now

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Understanding Brand archetypes is a powerful tool for helping you go beneath the surface and meet invisible and emerging needs.

According to the first archetype that we investigate, the Innocent, life does not have to be hard. The image of innocence conveys the message that you are free to be yourself and to live out your dreams right now.

Movie stars like Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks and Kate Winslet are also brands of the innocent, with movies that started from Forrest Gump, moved to Titanic approaching end of millenium, to then evolve into a more complex representation with American Beauty.

Innocent products include McDonald’s, Ivory, Mattel and Disney. Many brands appeal to the innocent archetype by promising salvation from an imperfect world.

This archetype is a good identity for brands that provide simple answers, have low to moderate prices and are produced by a company with arrow-straight values.

The innocent seeks fulfillment in the here and now, looks for products that provide the experience of peace and goodness right now, like to find a brand they can trust and stick to it, believing that “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Applies to products that make life simple, such as a user-friendly smartphone.

The Innocent archetype provides a good framework for brands and associated digital customer experiences that:

  • Provide a relatively simple answer to an identifiable problem.
  • Are associated with goodness, morality, simplicity, nostalgia, or childhood.
  • Have functions associated with cleanliness, health, or virtue — and that are infinitely replicable.
  • Are priced moderate to low.
  • Are produced by a company with straight-arrow core values.
  • Desire to differentiate from a product with a tarnished image.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Branding Archetypes

How Archetypes Changed How We Think About Digital Customer Experience

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As a marketer, you have to deal with increasing and global competition. Even if you succeed in creating an advantage for your customers, say an outstanding digital customer experience, a competitor can quickly copy it.

Today, companies are bought out other companies not for what they sold, but for the brands they had established. The brands, with their deeper iconic meetings, were valuable because of the intangible meanings they offered. And the management of this meaning, like many sound ideas, borrows from very ancient and eternal ones.
An archetype can be defined as a model that other things can be patterned on. The perfect example of a type or group. In marketing, you can think of it as a brand “typecast” or “personality type.”

The concept of archetypes was borrowed by Jung from classic sources. In Sanskrit, they were called "subjectively known forms". Carl Jung was the first to call them “archetypes.” “Archetypal psychology helps us understand the intrinsic meaning of product categories and consequently helps marketers create enduring brand identities that establish market dominance, evoke and deliver meaning to customers, and inspire customer loyalty -- all, potentially, in socially responsible ways.” (Carol Pearson and Margaret Mark, The Hero and the Outlaw).

Archetypal psychology helps you understand the intrinsic meaning of product categories and consequently helps you as a marketer create enduring brand identities that start conversations, evoke and deliver meaning to customers, and inspire customer loyalty.

The meaning your brand holds is a primal assets that must be managed as carefully as financial investments, delivering holistic and multi-sensory experiences ranging from view, touch interaction, and sound.

The best and most enduring brands are all archetypal, created to fulfill and embody fundamental human needs, according to neuromarketing and motivation theories:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises. The image of innocence conveys the message that you are free to be yourself and to live out your dreams right now.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in. The explorer seeks a better world. When the Explorer is active in customers, their call is to explore the world and, in the process, to find themselves, so that they know who they are. How did Starbucks convince people to pay over two dollars for coffee? Simple: the Explorer, artfully expressed in every detail: the product, the packaging, the shops, the logo, the name, and the experience of placing an order.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you. The sage’s central wisdom is an individual way of finding paradise. The sage wants to be free to think and believes in mankind’s capacity to grow.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil. John Kennedy, John Wayne, John Glenn and, of course, all superheroes are heroes.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken. This archetype has the attraction of forbidden fruit (yes, think about Apple).
  6. The Magician: How to get things done. The magician believes in understanding the rules and using them to accomplish specific goals. The magician has traditionally been the shaman and is at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary. The regular guy symbolizes situation comedies, country and other easy listening music.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance. The Lover governs all forms of human love. The Lover is common in the cosmetics, jewelry, fashion, and travel industries.
  9. The Jester: his motto: to live in the moment with full enjoyment; the Jester archetype wants us all to lighten up, have fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: Doing well by doing good. The caregiver is an altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better). The creator represents the artist, the writer, the entrepreneur and the innovator. Mozart and Picasso are symbols of the creator myth.
  12. The Ruler: Who’s in charge here? The ruler represents queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents or even capable career mothers. Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill, or anyone with power can be considered the ruler.

Myths and archetypes found all around the world are basically expressions of our inner human drama: we can understand them as different expressions of an eternal impulse to find our meaning in the mystery of creation. We “recognize” them because our brains have been programmed to do so.

And if you have only a few seconds to get your message across a customer-facing app or a responsive web site, you can do so more effectively if your message taps into the stories we all know already.

Shaping your digital customer experience without a system for managing the meaning of your brand is analogous to ancient navigators trying to find port in treacherous seas on a starless night. What all brands need today, be they a product, or a company, or yourself, is a reliable compass.

Whatever archetype you choose, or are chosen by, use these pages as your GPS and drive all your efforts to support that message consistently, as you will be trusted to the degree that everything you do is consistent.

Further insights for you on How To Connect With Your Digital Customers by Mapping Your Digital Customer Journey, Mobile First in our 7 steps digital customer experience checklist.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Neosperience Apps Innovation Neosperience Neuromarketing Analytics Branding Archetypes

Market Smarter with a Digital Customer Experience Analytics Dashboard

Use_a_Digital_Customer_Experience_Analytics_Dashboard_to_Market_Smarter

To make the right marketing decisions to adapt your Digital Customer Experience to rapidly changing events, you must know what has happened while interacting with your customer, why it happened, what the potential results of different actions might be and what actions you have to take.

Answering those questions requires fast access to sound, pertinent data, collected across all digital channels and touch-points between your brand and your customers: a DCX Analytics Dashboard.

Your company probably already uses a “scoring system.” It might even track “key performance indicators” (KPIs) or take advantage of “balanced scorecards.” If so, you might already be disappointed by how little these tools improve your performance and skeptical as to whether a different approach can have a significant impact in your marketing performance.

In order for a DCX Analytics Dashboard to be useful and deliver on your ultimate aim of helping make better decisions, you have to consider its single most important basic characteristic: to be aligned with your corporate goals:

  • Establish quantitative and qualitative DCX metrics specific to your organization and industry.
  • Move beyond simplistic vanity metrics from Twitter or Facebook. Track not just quantity (how many “likes” or how many fans, or people talk about you, how many people enter your physical and digital properties), but also “sentiment metrics” (whether those talks are “positive, negative or neutral”) and “dispersion metrics” (how widely comments vary), and "business metrics" how many customers are repeat ones, how many actually make a purchase, how much do they spend.
  • Shape your digital customer experience to be “globally integrated”, by adopting a company-wide standardized metric, and “locally customized.”

And finally, to make your DCX analytics truly actionable, implement a dashboard that leads to action, and help you and your marketing and sales team leverage big data to make instant decisions and take immediate action that translate into:

  • more relevant product recommendations;
  • well received push notifications;
  • social sharing to your customer’s peers.

In essence, among big ideas for 2014, start today shaping a DCX Analytics Dashboard that helps you drive more sales and implement it.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Innovation Neosperience Social Networking Analytics Retail

How To FIRE Your Customer-facing App

FIRE_Your_Customer-facing_App

Just finished reading an insightful new book from project management pro and military technology expert Dan Ward. An informative writing with wonderful asides and management war stories.

The insight: the best customer experience platforms and tools aren’t the most expensive and complicated.

And the proper way of doing them can be summarized in the FIRE acronym, inspired by the lean design principles, is embedded in the approach and tools used by some of the best technology developers in the world:

  • Fast” – The shorter the schedule and timeline are, the better your project outcome will be.
  • Inexpensive” – A small budget is more functional than a big budget. Financial capital is not the key factor; intellectual capital is what really matters.
  • Restrained” – Limit the documents you create, the time of the meetings you conduct, the budgets you allocate, the teams you direct and the schedules you set.
  • Elegant” – Shoot for project elements that are pleasingly ingenious and simple. Prioritize true design maturity and true process simplicity.

You are far more likely to deliver top-shelf results when you are working under constraints than when you are getting all the money, time and people you think you need. It seems counterintuitive, but in typical digital customer experience projects, such as customer-facing app developments, leaders who get large budgets, large teams and long schedules are unlikely to meet all – or even most – of their project objectives.

Actually project leaders with the largest budgets are statistically most likely to ask for more money and least likely to deliver an actual working product. The more time and money you spend on the thing, the more complicated it gets, which in turn drives up the cost and schedule even further as we wrestle with all the complexity.

In addition to FIRE, a good complement to maximize your effectiveness as a digital customer experience project leader is NASA’s “Faster, Better, Cheaper” (FCB) program, built on five operating principles:
  1. Do it wrong” – Create numerous “quick-and-dirty prototypes.” Many will fail, but you can learn from your mistakes.
  2. Reject good ideas” – Stay focused on the primary goal for your project.
  3. Simplify and accelerate” – Design your work to be clear and quick.
  4. Avoid innovation for innovation's sake” – For easier, faster testing and operating.
  5. Failure is an option” – If everything works perfectly, you’re not pushing the limits.

In a world of rapid change, long-term projects are a losing proposition:

  • Apply FIRE and FCB, focusing on building things you know how to build, using things you know how to use.
  • Don’t try to reinvent the wheel, the world is a big place with billions of people and a plenty of tools: be clever, do your research, then choose and use the right platform and partner.
  • Simplicity ain’t simple, while complexity usuallyindicates an immature design.
Your most successful projects will always be the least complicated.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Innovation Neosperience Project Management

Here’s Why Digital Customer Experience in Automotive is So Relevant

Here’s_Why_Digital_Customer_Experience_in_Automotive_is_So_Relevant_Tesla_640

Car manufacturers have understood the importance of delivering a personalized and consistent digital experience to customers across all touch devices and in the car.

A native digital customer experience that is more engaging and entertaining for users, regardless of the changing channels through which they interact and purchase.

Equally relevant is the capability to amp up sales efficiency - whether it’s offering recommendations for related products, setting real-time pricing, handing out perks.

We at Neosperience are addressing this challenge via a set of Apple iOS, Google Android, Microsoft Windows Phone, and HTML5 pre-built modules, which render a consistent experience across the different smartphone, tablet and smart TV form factors, delivering customer engagement before the purchase and after, whether drivers are digitally engaged at home, at work, in-store or in-car.

By focusing on connected vehicle innovation, we aim at speeding-up the industry evolution from a product to a customer experience-centric value proposition, turning automotive players into technology leaders.

Thanks to this effort, automotive players will be able to create and access cloud computing resources, data sources and real-time analytics, leveraging sophisticated data - both vehicle and customer-related - to turn big data into big insights for use by third-parties and governments (e.g., traffic infrastructure utilization data), paving the way towards a future leadership in self-driving vehicle offerings.

Neosperience for CarPlay and Android Auto will allow people to use all digital customer experience functionality without actually touching the device. You can jump start by supporting the emerging behavior of vehicle owners in purchasing songs, audio books or movies from within their vehicles, to evolve the vision of self-aware vehicles as the foundation for improving safety and road utilization, optimizing traffic flow, managing drivers’ cognitive load.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Innovation Automotive

We Want You To Become A Marketing Superhero

We_Want_You_To_Become_A_Marketing_Superhero

Superheroes are archetypes, and coincide with the true mythic hero. They have the power, hear the mystic call. Are sent to Earth to fight evil, their mission. This is the hero, male or female, in its purest form.

As noted by Joseph Campbell, usually the hero's adventure begins when someone is deprived of something or a feeling that something is lacking the experience allowed the members of his society. Then the hero embarks on a series of extraordinary adventures, or to recover what has been lost, or to discover some elixir of life.

We at Neosperience believe that today what is missing is the freedom of the customer: it is now time to free her from the shackles of traditional advertising, a waste of time, from both the marketer perspective, as well as from hers, time which could be used in more interesting and constructive ways.

And we believe that the superhero is the marketer, that we are empowering with superpowers, a manager with extraordinary abilities like being anywhere and everywhere, reading the minds of his customer to become useful and stay at her service, materializing objects right in her hands. In essence, a marketer able to shape a better world by providing a best-in-class digital customer experience that challanges the status quo of his company's wrong beliefs.

This is the marketer for which we have created Neosperience, and wake up every day.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Innovation Neuromarketing Branding Archetypes

Neuromarketing and the Art of the Digital Customer Experience

Neuromarketing_And_The_Digital_Customer_Experience

Neuromarketing is a relatively new field of marketing research activity that is informed by the findings or insights of brain science.

The key discoveries of this decade applied to digital customer experience allow you to connect with customers in a whole new way across physical touch points, typically the stores, combined with customer-facing smartphone and tablet apps.
Customers are constantly surrounded by brands and messages from marketers and advertisers and what has been understood is that apart from the noise and the misbelief that the rational mind is the purchase driver, actually only subconscious thoughts, feelings and passions drive purchase decisions, that are justified “a posteriori”: rationally after being made emotionally.

Customer-facing mobile apps, capable of understanding the user mood from facial-expression detection, down to the actual monitoring of how the smartphone is held and used, can help marketers engage with customers more effectively, in a marketing world that has become too noisy for a communication that is just visual.

To this purpose, savvy customer-facing mobile app developers:

  • Must blend-in technology and advances in human behavioral research to understand what motivates customers.
  • Exploit such knowledge, including online and in-store behavioral data, to drive customer preference.
  • Rely on a more holistic marketing proposition, based on data collected inside the app, and during the whole customer journey.

Thanks to the level of customer behavior understanding provided by neuromarketing, interactivity between brands and customers will become more relevant, with the help of technology, which now allows customers to stay connected directly and i.e. order customized products from top brands.

Today, an omni-channel digital customer experience can translate into the most powerful brand experience, involving deeper links between the customer and the manufacturer.

In the future, advancements in Augmented Reality will eventually allow manufacturers incorporate a brand platform that fully integrates the five senses, and thanks to a combined participations of app and point of sale, a brand will become a sensory experience that extends beyond the traditional paradigm, which primarily addresses sight and sound.

In a world where about 80% of new products fail, providing a distinct and unique sensory stimuli with positive associations and customer engagement driven by an effective digital customer experience is the most relevant opportunity to boost brand loyalty.

Never forget that the perception of your brand is as good as reality.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Future Neuromarketing Retail

Discover The Essence Of Digital Customer Experience Innovation

Neosperience_New_Customer_Journey

Marketers can improve their innovation techniques, though creativity comes more easily to some than to others.

Successful digital customer experience innovators develop and apply five critical skills:

  1. Practice associative thinking by making connections among various ideas from disparate areas.
  2. Ask questions, be willing to look foolish.
  3. Observe what your customers do, how they do it and why.
  4. Network with people from a range of backgrounds.
  5. Experiment: take something apart, study your customer journey, build models and try simulations.

Innovative managers hire, reward, retain and encourage innovative and open-minded people and systematically follow discovery processes, support questioning and experimentation, and invest in ideas that challenge the status quo, taking advantage of new technologies (i.e. the upcoming iOS 8).

If you want your company to succeed at digital customer experience, what we learned at Neosperience working for many first-class customers is that you as a manager must:

  • Practice creativity skills.
  • Never oversimplify or expect that innovation always succeeds.
  • Ask for help and follow identified practices that correlate with commercial achievement, including strong analytics monitoring, as explained in the DCX 7 steps checklist.
  • Build your own set of key innovation philosophies that instill a deep, companywide commitment to innovation, write them on a post-it note and live by them.
  • Connect ideas from disparate arenas – as the most important skill that triggers associational thinking and support creativity; this will lead to new business ideas that flourish at the intersection of diverse experience, whether it be your own or others’.

Assess your company by considering that innovative organizations are led by innovative leaders. Is yours so? If yes, checked. If not, change your leader. Or change your job.

Start today by assessing whether your creativity skills are strong or weak. Then, identify a compelling innovation challenge that matters. Practice your skills and find a coach to support your efforts. Develop your creative abilities by helping others develop theirs. And beware of wolf.

The eureka moment will then come... when you don't expect.

To help you provide a strategic advantage to your organization, Neosperience has crafted the first DCX 7-Steps Checklist, with requirements and insights for a successful digital transformation. Download the free guide here:

Download DCX 7-Steps Checklist

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Innovation Analytics Retail Inbound Marketing

Don't Let Your Digital Manager Jeopardize Your Customer Base

Dont_Let_Your_Digital_Manager_Destroy_Your_Customer_Base

We all agree, I think, to the fact that markets are conversations and that your brand must become a publisher, focusing, in the age of the customer, on establishing a direct relationship with your customers, thanks to their smartphones and tablets, and across all digital channels.

If so, would you please explain to me why you listen to unscrupulous companies around that offer you to participate in improbable kind-of-iBeacon driven coalition programs, with the obvious and only purpose to steal your customer base?

And, more importantly, would you please explain me why you give them credit and like to be fooled?

Doesn’t it come to your mind that if a digital marketing services provider delivers to you a customer engagement service for free, the most likely reason why it’s doing it is that it takes a benefit even if this is not immediately obvious to you, such as your customer base becomes his?

Let's not act as amateurs and let's get to work seriously to our companies’ digital customer experience, allocating the brain and the budget needed to make things right.

Or rather do nothing. But the fact that managers in your company play with fire and foolishly gift your customer base to third-party operators, in exchange for wonderful and equally improbable business results is not just unnecessary, it is criminal!

Rise your hand and stop these digital managers put your company on its knees, before they destroy more value for you and your shareholders.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience

The Second Industrial Revolution and How You Can Recover

The_2nd_Industrial_Revolution_and_How_You_Can_Recover

You have been thought that The Industrial Revolution has been the most influential development in history. Today, you are living through a second, comparable revolution. The Industrial Revolution changed how people used their bodies to perform physical labor. This current revolution is changing how people use their minds to perform conceptual labor.

Unlike the steam engine or electricity, the second machine age technologies continue to improve at an exponential pace, replicating their power with digital perfection and creating even more opportunities for combinatorial innovation, Digital Customer Experience we at Neosperience focus on being just an example of these.

A decade after Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) “first Grand Challenge” to spur people “to build a completely autonomous vehicle”, Google produces cars that drive themselves in traffic, that you will be soon able to choose from a Digital Car Showroom.

Similar advances have emerged in language processing and the use of general knowledge, including shifts in how people view computing and in robotics. Developing devices to perform tasks once considered “difficult” and conceptually challenging have proved easier than designing machines to complete manual labor. And machines that can complete cognitive tasks are even more important than machines that can accomplish physical ones.

But adapting to new technology is challenging. For example, when electricity was new, people applied it as a straightforward substitution: They removed steam engines and put electric motors in their place. But they did not change the design of factory layouts. This made no sense since steam engines required a specific arrangement of machines around “a single massive engine,” while electricity called for placing smaller, electric motors at each machine. With a steam engine, the equipment that needed the most power had to be closest to the engine. Once electric motors were available, managers reorganized factories according to “workflow,” not energy needs.

That shift took 30 years, and only then did productivity surge as the result of electricity. The same phenomenon occurred with computers and the internet, and today with smartphones and tablets: firms made minimal initial changes in productivity, but later they undertook widespread efforts to integrate computers and generate surges in productivity, eventually giving birth to new and disruptive business models.

The constant increase in productivity led to the belief that technological advances help everyone. In a striking historical discontinuity, wages and productivity decoupled in our age of technology. But while average income rises, indicating an increase in overall productivity, median income is falling, indicating that most people earn less. Only a few people harvest the wealth generated by increased productivity.

Creativity and organizational redesign are crucial to proper investments in digital technologies. Education must change to fit contemporary needs, moving away from the industrial age ideal of standardization toward methods that promote creativity, curiosity and adaptation. We have to increase the quality of and opportunity for primary education. Encourage experimentation. Use technology where useful and change how schools deliver education. Help customer choose. Transform marketing in a game. Make people work less, and better, but promote communities in which people work: whether rich or poor, these are healthier than communities in which people do not, as we all gain “self-worth” from working.

Technology is not your destiny. You shape your destiny. Find your blue ocean and change the world.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Human Capital Management Society Future

Make Your Customers Play

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Traditional advertising has lost effectiveness and while once-effective advertising methods do not work as well anymore, game playing is on the rise and vying for your customers’ attention.

To be relevant, as a brand you must become a publisher. To compete with games, your marketing must become a game.

People play games – on phones, on computers, on game consoles – everywhere; learning how to engage your customers through interactive game play and taking advantage of this growing trend is a needed ability to become more effective as a marketer.

Properly designed, branded games can be an engaging and “sticky” user experience, especially on mobiles, driving your customers to her flow. Stickiness is a metric of loyalty that measures the relationship between the span of time a person spends on an app and the number of her annual visits.

Loyalty programs already proved that gaming and marketing create a happy marriage. But your customers are getting bored and are not interested anymore in just points, earned by spending money. As products become commoditized, also it is becoming loyalty, that keeps people buying. Modern loyalty programs use a number of gaming elements to engender loyalty, including point accumulation, level climbing, rewards and challenges.

People enjoy competing, playing games and winning. People are intrinsically competitive and relish the process of participating in a game, even if the prizes you deliver are small, symbolic or virtual. They like to compete against themselves when they’re when not vying against others. A well-designed branded game can produce substantial psychological rewards.

Richard Bartle, a professor and behaviorist, identified four types of game players:

  • Achievers” – These players like to acquire points and earn status. They enjoy the process of playing and want to play well. They like working with others and sharing the joys and defeats of the game.
  • Socializers” – These players enjoy the social component of playing games, such as interacting, forming alliances and collaborating.
  • Explorers” – These players take pleasure in game playing activities and elements, such as accumulating points or badges, uncovering shortcuts or figuring out puzzles.
  • Killers” – These players thrive on competition and have a win-at-all-costs mentality.

Only games can help you cut through the clutter of a crowded brand marketplace and socially networked environment to attract, retain and monetize customers.

Stay tuned for a white paper to be released soon: the future of marketing is games, and it has already started.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Branded Games

What I Learned From Neosperience FedEx Days

What_I_Learned_From_Neosperience_FedEx_DaysOver this weekend I shared with my team the opportunity to work on anything that relates to our products in the digital customer experience space, and deliver it during a two-days hackathon, to experiment new and creative ideas, making the emptiness that each of us must do to be able to stand on the shoulders of the giants who preceded us, and create.

During this very intense and productive professional retreat, organized according to the FedEx days format, I was struck by the quality of the result of teamwork, in a short time, and the sharpness of the vision of the team.

  • Foster creativity – With no rules, apart from working on a very broad topic like customer experience, anything’s possible.
  • Scratch itches – We all have something that bugs us about a product the world is waiting for.
  • Be radical – The main idea is simply devoting time to ideas that might not normally be prioritized. All of us are pirates.
  • Have fun! – The spas of Abano have been the ideal setting to give to our mind the shot of color with the brush that Emilio Vedova, a teacher at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Venice, he used to give the canvas of his students to overcome their blank canvas syndrome.

By the way, do not really know how to play the piano, but the setting for the photo was cute :)

As great author Daniel H. Pink said about the changing world of work, maybe it’s time to ask yourself not, “Should I try something like this?” — but “Why am I not doing this already?”

Like and forward this to your HR manager, or, better, to your CEO ;)

Topics: Human Capital Management Society Future