Your source of insights for a successful digital transformation.

Make Your Messaging More Interactive by Adding a Human

Make_Your_Messaging_More_Interactive_by_Adding_a_Human_(by_Miu_Miu_-_Prada)

After debuting on the App Store with the successful digital customer experience App back in 2012: Il Palazzo, Prada returns to the digital scene at the crossroads between art and society with a film at Venice International Film Festival, and associated App, in collaboration with performance artist Miranda July.

Often you can't tell a loved one something very sad, or very nice, and so asking the help of a stranger close to the recipient to deliver the message helps mediate the communication and avoid cold and impersonal texting, or delivery via Facebook or Twitter.

In the film, produced by Hi! Production and playable using Miu Miu Women’s Tales App, powered by Neosperience, you have a powerful view of this possible future of “human-mediated” messaging.

In Somebody App, “the most high-tech is not in the programming, it’s in the users who dare to deliver a message to a stranger”.

Miu Miu Women's Tales App for iOS showcases the results of Prada on-going project to support emerging women film directors. In addition to this latest short, you can play the full version of the first five films by directors Ava DuVernay, Massy Tadjedin, Giada Colagrande, Lucrecia Martel and Zoe Cassavetes, each with extra features including behind the scenes coverage and interviews with the director and cast.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Branded Games Society Future Neosperience Apps Innovation Neosperience Facebook Archetypes Retail Storytelling Content Marketing Fashion Luxury and Beauty

4 Habits of Highly Effective Listeners

4_Habits_of_Highly_Effective_Listeners_(small)

Portable technology, from the Walkman to the iPod and smartphones, have made listening to people and to our environment an increasingly tiring task. In addition to ubiquitous digital devices, the persistent noise of our society has made listening even more difficult.

As a result, in a couple of decades we have lost the ability to hear, that our brain had shaped in tens of thousands of years in the course of our evolution.

Especially among the youngest, many people have simply thrown in the towel, retreating into their own cocoons of personal soundscapes via their headphones.

In the past, even in a noisy environment, our brain was much more effective in applying techniques to extricate specific sounds from a cacophony to determine what they hear. For example by using:

  • “pattern recognition” to isolate familiar sounds;
  • “differencing” the brain capability to block out “white or pink noise” and focus on sounds that change;
  • “filtering,” applied unconsciously based on culture, language and value.

As for other abilities — so important for our personal and professional life — challenged by habits that make them less and less relevant, to eventually disappear, we have to run for cover and recover before the process becomes irreversible.

Once a day:

  1. Take off your headphones.
  2. Text less and increase the frequency of spoken conversations.
  3. Choose to listen to two minutes of silence to "reset" your ears.
  4. Whenever you find yourself in a noisy environment, pay attention and try to isolate discrete sounds and focus on each one.

When engaged in a conversation, keep it to the essence and apply the “RASA” principle; Rasa is the Sanskrit word for “essence,” suggested as mnemonic in his TED Talk by Julian Treasure — chairman of The Sound Agency, which advises on the importance of environmental acoustics and best practices in listening:

  • “Receive” (pay attention while you listen).
  • “Appreciate” (use small verbalizations to acknowledge that you are listening).
  • “Summarize” (recap what you heard).
  • “Ask” (pose questions).

Take these simple habits and in a few weeks you will become a better listener, and better connect and understand people around you.

Topics: Human Capital Management Society Future Neuromarketing Sound Storytelling

Map Your Digital Customer Journey, Mobile First

Digital_Customer_Journey_Map

A digital customer journey map is a tool that enables you to understand and optimize your customers’ digital experiences.

It outlines the digital customer experience in a customer-centered perspective, helping you:

  1. Understand how prospect and customers are interacting with you now.
  2. Identify areas for improvement moving forward.
  3. Choose the appropriate technology and business models to effectively engage people at every touchpoint in the digital customer experience lifecycle, and prioritize your investment.

Great customer journey maps are rooted in data-driven research, often coming from market research, and show the different phases of your customers' experiences across all touchpoints, based on a variety of dimensions such as sentiment, objectives, consistency with the attributes of your brand, and more.

 Digital_Customer_Journey_Map_Example_1Digital_Customer_Journey_Map_Example_2Digital_Customer_Journey_Map_Example_3Digital_Customer_Journey_Map_Example_4

Evolving the vision of the traditional and outdated marketing funnel, most digital customer journey maps are not linear: a customer can jump from one phase to another based on a number of factors, delivering on his/her expectation to live heightened digital experiences anytime, anywhere, personal, and simple, what we summed up in our previous post as the “now-for me-my own way-easy” promise.

Mobile and real-time marketing have joined social in disrupting business models that cannot keep up with your connected and informed customers. Identifying both physical and digital touchpoints, customers’ behaviors, then mapping out the digital customer journey is your first and essential step to effectively compete as a unified business in connected markets.

Among the key metrics along your digital customer journey, consider:

  • Channel: smartphone and tablet (always go mobile first), computer, smart TV, connected objects,
 and your physical stores.
  • Number and duration of visitor and visit (digital, footstore traffic).
  • Frequency of visit (returning to the app/site/store directly – through a URL or bookmark, a referral - or indirectly).
  • % repeat visits.
  • Recency of visit.
  • Depth of visit (% of app/site/store visited).
  • Tap-though and Click-through rate / interactions with sales staff in-store.
  • Sales.
  • Lifetime value.
  • RSS feed / newsletter subscriptions.
  • Bookmarks.
  • Interaction with in-store tags (i.e. Smart Bluetooth, NFC) and rate of engagement.
  • Customer Ratings, Reviews, Comments and valued engagement/disengagement.
  • Viewing of high-value or medium-value content (as valued from your organisation’s point-of-view).
  • Depth of digital/physical/hybrid visit.
  • Inquiries (digital, to sales personnel).
  • Personal information provided and depth of customer profile.
  • Downloads.
  • Content resyndication, inbound links.

Even if yours is just an initial project, a "first and tentative customer-facing app", turn this opportunity to your advantage by mapping your digital customer journey, mobile first. You will start on the right foot and take the fundamental journey towards the profound digital transformation of your business in the years to come.

 

To help you provide a strategic advantage to your organization, Neosperience has crafted the first DCX 7-Steps Checklist, with requirements and insights for a successful digital transformation. Download the free guide here:

Download DCX 7-Steps Checklist

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Innovation Neosperience Project Management Analytics Retail Storytelling Content Marketing Mobile Customer Journey

How To Connect With Your Digital Customers

Digital_Customer

Digital Customer Experience (DCX) is defined as the sum of all digital experiences customers have with a supplier of products or services, over the duration of their relationship with that supplier.

It’s implications span beyond technology investments — to engage customers with digital tools at every touchpoint — into the realms of marketing, infrastructure, organization and leadership.

Reviewing the ontology of digital customer experience, there is a disparity between this “experience as everything” definition and a more practical meaning: experience in a personal and memorable way, that creates a distinct economic offer, different from the products or services delivered, that allows to connect with customers in a whole new way across smartphone and tablet, computer, smart TV, connected objects, and internet-of-things -enabled physical stores.

This is a more specific and actionable definition, that shows the urgency for most organizations (apart from pure players like Apple and Amazon), to realign or do new investments in technology and business models.

Good digital customer experience — the perception people have of their interactions with your organization — keeps them coming back again and again and is today the most critical differentiator. Your customers are dazzled by digital experiences that are enjoyable, innovative, and contextual. How are you going to keep up delivering on your brand promise at each point of the decision process?

It s now essential to meet your customers’ expectations by delivering them heightened digital experiences anytime, anywhere, personal, and simple:

Now

  • Your customers want an experience, not (just) a product.
  • They want to be engaged  storytelling and gamification help — share their experience in real-time with other people and receive feedback.
  • They want to be provided with a real-time, connected global marketplace — in which they can interact with other people and you — with any of their devices, starting from their smartphone and tablet.

For them

  • They want to receive personalized content and benefits.
  • They expect they can go direct with your business.
  • They expect to live a purchase experience which resonates the behavior of the elite of society prior to the Industrial Revolution, moving beyond outdated one-size-fits-all and mass customization model.

Their own way

  • They want you to deliver support online or in-store. Set up an appointment with a store assistant as they like.
  • They want to visit your store digitally, and discover your products as if they were physically there, with any of their devices.
  • They want to locate the closest point of sales/service, know when it's open, be guided there.

Easy

  • They want to do all these things easily and with any of their devices, seamlessly syncing their digital experience through their personal cloud.

We’ve entered the Age of the Customer — an era where a focus on customers matters more than any other strategic imperative.

Digital customers’ perceptions of the experience you deliver at every touchpoint have a profound impact on your business metrics ranging from brand equity and customer loyalty to increased revenue and cost savings.

“There are going to be seven billion smartphones in everybody’s hands in the next five years. Now, everybody is a digital customer, so doing things digitally is no longer a niche. Doing things digitally is how the entire world communicates.”
- Angela Ahrendts, former Burberry’s CEO, Head of Retail Apple since mid-2014 

Look at every dimension of your customer digital experience, mapping out the digital customer journey first, then paying attention to everything that affects the customer’s disposition while looking for a product from you or one of your competitors, deciding to buy, and while actually buying and using it.

The steps are:

  1. Shape your buyer personas as generalized representations of your ideal customers.
  2. Map their digital customer journey describing their behavior as the interactions at the different touchpoints with your brand and product.
  3. Design the experience, mobile first: use the 7 Steps DCX Checklist.
  4. Build the platform linking your content marketing and DCX.
  5. Launch, monitor, learn and innovate, to improve continuously.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Society Innovation Social Networking Project Management Analytics Branding Storytelling Content Marketing

How To Apply The 80/20 Rule To Your Digital Customer Experience

How_To_Apply_The_80-20_Rule_To_Your_Digital_Customer_Experience

A small number of laws underlie all natural phenomena. Newton discovered the laws that govern motion and gravity and many of these principles in the 17th century.

3 centuries later, economist Vilfredo Pareto observed that 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population; similarly that 20% of the pea pods in his garden contained 80% of the peas.
Many natural phenomena have been shown empirically to exhibit such a distribution: roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

As a result, a common rule of thumb in business was developed: "80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients".

It is likely that this also applies to you, as most people waste time and energy on things that don’t matter — devoting a lot of your effort on activities that produce minimal returns.

As a marketer, your first step to get anyone buy your product or service is to make people listen to you. You need first to get ears and eyeballs. Today there is a huge range of digital channels and media you can use to get in your customer’s mind and be chosen:

  • Foot traffic in a retail store.
  • Traditional audiovisual media, such as radio and TV.
  • Banned advertising, popup, pop-under and other formats on targeted sites and mobile apps.
  • Google AdWords.
  • Newsletters.
  • Facebook, Twitter, Linkedln and SlideShare posts and ads.
  • YouTube videos.
  • Press releases and Books.
  • White Papers and Webinars.
  • Exhibitions at trade shows.

Start understanding which of these activities provide more Return On Effort — considering both external and internal costs plus your precious time, the only truly scarce resource — to recognize and focus on the 20% of effort that produces the greatest impact.

  1. Recognize that finding a market before designing a product is smarter than the reverse.
  2. Do a honest SWOT analysis to identify your strengths. It is far more fruitful and fun to leverage your strengths instead of attempting to fix your weaknesses.
  3. Identify the 20% of your product or service range that produces most sales.
  4. Find your customers and stakeholders that generate 80% of your profits: in most cases they will be far less than 20%.
  5. Use an analytics dashboard to identify 20% the most used features in your customer-facing app.
  6. And finally tailor content marketing and digital customer experience to create and nurture your customer base. Selling to the right person is the most important of all the sales methods, negotiation tactics or copywriting techniques.

Laser-focus your efforts on prospects who already understand what you do, have problems you can solve, and believe in what you believe.

Become a marketing superhero by doing less meaningless work, so that you can focus on things of greater importance, for your business and for yourself. You will get far more results for a fraction of the effort.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Human Capital Management Society Future Project Management Analytics Retail Content Marketing

Why Your True Why Is So Important, Backed By Science

Start_Your_Digital_Customer_Experience_With_Your_Why

Why some leaders and companies succeeded and others do not?

Inspirational leaders identify a purpose and follow it. The actions they take and what they make is secondary to achieving their mission.

Whatever you do:

  1. You have to start with a vision — your true Why;
  2. then move to implementation — your How;
  3. finally, just as the third thing, focus on the product or service you deliver — your What.

Unfortunately, most of us have this pattern backward. We first focus on what we do and how; then we try to differentiate our product or service based on price, quality or features, and just a few of us ask, if ever, why we do what we do.

As there are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it, or you can inspire it, we see all around us that most marketers manipulate rather than inspire. Businesses influence customers by leveraging price, promotions, fear, peer pressure, aspirations and novelty. Aspirational messages and innovation, especially those with a well grounded brand archetype, supported by neuromarketing, are even more subtle forms of manipulation.

Inspiring leaders and companies, act and communicate exactly vice versa.

Neuroscientist Richard Restak, who writes about the power of the limbic system in The Naked Brain, says that when people are forced to make decisions based on data alone, they take more time and usually overanalyze the situation. On the other hand gut decisions tend to be faster and higher-quality decisions. Choices that aren’t rooted in emotion can lead people to doubt whether they made the right decisions, but those with a reliable gut background generate more confidence and less second-guessing.

As inspiring writer Simon Sinek discussed in his TED speech, imagine if every organization started with Why: decisions would be simpler; customer loyalty would be higher; trust would become the currency.

Your goal, as for any business leader or marketer, should not be to do business with anyone who wants what you have. It should be to do business with the people who believe what you believe.

Take time, think, look for your true why, the true sense of why you do what you do that comes from looking inside yourself and reflecting on your life.

Identify your purpose, cause or vision, the one thing that really makes you get out of your bed every morning.

Then build your brand and digital customer experience on it.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Human Capital Management Society Future Neosperience Neuromarketing Branding Archetypes Storytelling Content Marketing

How Gamification Will Deliver The Ultimate Digital Customer Experience

Gamification

In the past decade, we have seen the initial building of a social media layer across the world. Even though other companies were involved and are still exploring it, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn have defined how that layer appears.

The next decade will be the decade of games. We will see and use it more and more to influence behavior, and have fun playing.

People enjoy competing, playing games and winning. They also revel in watching other people compete, as demonstrated by the popularity of talent shows. People relish the process of participating in a game, even if the prizes are small, symbolic or virtual.

In digital marketing, a game layer will spread across the world replacing traditional loyalty marketing as the most effective tool. If scoring points, getting to higher levels in a game or completing progress bars motivates people, why shouldn’t those elements of fun work in business and in shaping a new and more effective digital customer experience?

Loyalty programs already use game dynamics, but they are not yet fun. With game dynamics, you can influence how people act. Consider these examples as some of the most used, among the 47 gamification dynamics supported by Neosperience:

  • Appointment dynamic – In real life, a happy hour, a promotion offering cut price gelatos, coffees or drinks, draws people to go to a certain bar at a certain time. Experiences developed in b2b2c projects like Carpigiani MyGelato App and Network, but also b2e (business-to-employee) trade gamification initiatives, for shoe manufacturer and retailer Bata proved this concept to be far more relevant than we initially imagined. Why don’t we move forward, in example by inventing a game that spurs people to take their medicine on time and gives them points for doing so?
  • Influence and status – Ruler brand American Express offers a perfect example. People want their expensive “black” card because it certifies status.
  • Progression dynamic – LinkedIn employs a progress bar to give users incentives to enter more information, increasing the value of their customer database exponentially, according to Metcalfe's Law.
  • Communal discovery – Twitter and Facebook uses this dynamic: People work together to improve the relevance of stories.

Bring these concepts to the physical world thanks to Smart Bluetooth beacons and NFC tags to let people find objects (why not your products?) and places (why not your retail locations?), and you will have combined content marketing, gamification and digital customer experience to build a marketing machine able to influence customer behavior and let people experience your brand and products like never before.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Branded Games Society Future Neosperience Apps Innovation Neosperience Social Networking Facebook iOS Android Retail

4 Easy Fixes to Link Content Marketing and Digital Customer Experience

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Old transaction-focused marketing used to shout at consumers and emphasized benefits. Today consumers don't exist anymore, having been replaced by Customers. Increased trust in peer-to-peer communication has vaporized the influence of traditional advertising. Digital marketing must consequently concentrate on customer engagement, the pivotal driver of a well shaped digital customer experience.

Everyone can produce and distribute content cheaply and easily. You can develop your own distribution network via social media, blogs and newsletters; on microblogging sites such as Twitter; or by smartphone and tablet apps. You can speak directly to customers, and they can give instant feedback in ways that were not possible before. Customers talk to each other in peer-to-peer conversations that bear weight and yield influence. Today, everyone is a marketer and the reality now is that more marketing messages are created, shared and listened to by the public than by marketing departments.

Customer-facing apps provide instant access to information and almost limitless choices, but to be relevant you must engage customers with appealing content that provides real value and treat them as empowered participants in dialogues about your product or service.

The value is no longer in the product or service that you deliver to your customers, but mainly in the experience that they receive when engaging with your business.

Gaining customers’ attention now is more important than conducting transactions. Your company’s goal is to draw potential customers and keep them engaged with a compelling storytelling, so when they decide to make a purchase, they come to you. The funnel has been flipped and transformed into a customer journey, and your goal is to make this journey memorable and unique.

This new “engagement” model replaces the “transaction” model. “Return on engagement” (ROE) has usurped “return on investment” (ROI) as the value driver.

Appealing content engages customers. If you are able to present relevant, interesting material through various channels that your clients find valuable, and you are able to maintain the momentum and keep on delivering value over a long period of time, it will not be clear where marketing stops and selling starts.

Such marketing positions your company as an expert and go-to source and reference in your field. For example, a sentiment analysis software provider’s web site and app might offer tips about how to monitor your reputation online. The company could produce a podcast or YouTube video on the same subject, and offer webinars. Such activities position you so that when people are ready to buy they will remember you as a helpful provider.

To create relevant content, understand that these influences are at work:

  • The true challenges customers are facing.
  • The behaviors customers exhibit – This includes demographic and lifestyle data, that you can collect from social behavior and use to your advantage thanks to right-time personalization.
  • The context in which searches and purchases take place, identifying recurring patterns and trigger points that precede a purchase.
  • The customer’s broad view of the buying cycle – Analyzing the customer journey and determining how often, when and why people purchase your product or service. More insights in our 7 Steps Digital Customer Experience Checklist.

Producing relevant content is just one step. Putting that content where people can find it within an omnichannel strategy, focused on customer-facing apps that comply with your brand essence, is the crucial next step that requires you to become a marketing superhero.

Develop a keyword and app naming strateg to ascertain which words people enter in search engines when they want to find out about your product or service. Seek long-tail keywords, three-word or longer phrases. Include these keywords in all your digital communication. Make sure your content and app is relevant and share-worthy and let your customers play with it.

It is no longer what you say about yourself that matters; it is what others say that really counts. When people share your content through your app on social networks, that’s far more effective than any other kind of marketing.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Innovation Neosperience Social Networking Facebook Retail Content Marketing Inbound Marketing

The Secret Of Making A Ruler Brand Like Mercedes

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Whether you’re selling a soft drink or a politician, what your brand means to people will be as important as its function — if not more so — because it is meaning that tells us “This one feels right” or “This one’s for me”.

Among the archetypes studied so far, the Ruler represents queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents or even capable career mothers. Margaret Thatcher, Winston Churchill, any Supreme Court Justice or anyone with power can be considered the Ruler.

Mercedes Benz, American Express, Microsoft, Brooks Brothers, Citibank and IBM are considered ruler brands. Ruler brands and associated digital customer experience appeal to the customer’s wish to be powerful and important. The ruler identity might be right for your brand if you make a high-status product used by the powerful to enhance their stature, help people become organized or provide stability in our unstable world.

The Ruler archetype likes hierarchical organizations because, in them, you know where you stand. Your role is clearly defined by a job description that tells you what you are supposed to do. You know who reports to you and who your boss is.

Bill Gates (who later in his life evolved into the Caregiver archetype) and Paul Allen purchased an existing system from another company, developed it, and entered into a partnership with IBM that was highly advantageous to Microsoft. IBM could use MS-DOS, but Microsoft kept ownership of the software and was also allowed to license its use to other firms. As a result, every time IBM sold a PC, it promoted Microsoft. Of course, appealing to the Ruler, Microsoft always wanted to let the customer have power. At the same time rulers like control, and they do not like to be told what to do.

The Ruler identity might be right for your brand and digital customer experience if you sell a high-status product used by people to enhance their power; a product that helps people be more organized; a product at the moderate to high price range or seeking to differentiate from a more populist one or that is the clear leader in the field (Regular Guy/Girl). In essence in all situations when your brand promise is relative stability, safety and predictability in a chaotic world.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Neosperience Automotive Branding Archetypes Storytelling

How Top Brands Use The Creator Brand Archetype to Get Customers

creator

Discovered by Jung, explored by Hillman and more recently by psychologists and marketing experts Carol Pearson and Margaret Mark, brand archetypes are the forms that underlie our deep thought that influence our perceptions, motivations and behavior as customers.

Among these brand archetypes, the Creator represents the artist, the writer, the entrepreneur and the innovator. Mozart and Picasso are symbols of the creator myth. Martha Stewart, Crayola and Singer represent creator brands. The creator brand is essentially nonconformist. A Creator brand positioning might be a good match for your company and digital customer experience if your product encourages self-expression, provides customers with choices and options, helps foster innovation or is artistic in design.

Creator brands are inherently nonconformist. The Creator is not about fitting in, but about self-expression, fostering real innovation and beauty.

The Creator desire is to create something of enduring value, giving form to a vision. Ultimately, what the Creator desires is to form a work of art so special that it will endure. And, in this way, the Creator achieves a kind of immortality.

Palm Pilot, for those of you who remember it, got almost instant brand recognition marketing the device with pictures of artistic and successful people holding it. In these ads, the company was not just selling the Palm Pilot and what it could do; rather, they were selling the symbolic value of the artist’s life. Its success was therefore amplified by the fact that both men and women love brands that help them release the Creator within.

Creator organizations are found in the arts, in design, in marketing, and in other fields requiring a high degree of imaginative and “out-of-the-box” thinking. Examples include: Lego, Sony, Swatch, 3M.

A Creator identity may be right for your brand if your product’s function encourages self-expression, provides the customer with choices and options, helps foster innovation, or is artistic in design.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.

4 Essential Qualities Of The Caregiver That'll Change Your Mind

caregiver

Experts once considered archetypal meaning in marketing to be quaint and interesting. Today defining your brand’s archetypal symbolism is a prerequisite.

The Caregiver brand archetype has a heightened awareness of human vulnerability, is less focused on concern for him- or herself and is more preoccupied with alleviating other people’s problems. He anticipates people’s needs, seeing what will make them feel secure, safe, and nurtured.

His mantra is “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Doing well by doing good. The Caregiver is an altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others. Pope Francis, Mother Teresa, Bill & Melinda Gates and Princess Diana symbolize this archetype.

The essential qualities of the caregiving relationship are:

  • Empathy — seeing and feeling things from another’s perspective, not just our own.
  • Communication — listening — to what others say, what don’t say, and especially, what they mean.
  • Consistency — wholesale, reliable, unquestioning commitment.
  • Trust — the foundation of true attachment.

The Caregiver archetype is present in all the brands and digital customer experience related to taking care of people and the physical world — gardening; cleaning clothes, homes, offices, and streets; mending clothes, roads and bridges, or anything at all that is broken; caring for the sick and the elderly.

The Caregiver is a good identity for brands from Emergency to Volvo to Prenatal, for which customer service provides the competitive advantage, for services in the health care, education, for non-profit causes and charitable activities and other caregiving fields; for services that help people stay connected with and care about one another, or care for themselves. 

The Caregiver is always related to the Innocent, because it is usually the Caregiver who makes the Innocent’s desire for a safe and beautiful world come true.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Neosperience Branding Archetypes Retail Storytelling

Let The Jester Tease Your Digital Customer Experience

jester2The Jester archetype includes the clown, the trickster, and anyone at all who loves to play or cut up. In politics Jesters are essentially anarchistic, as illustrated by Emma Goldman, the famous anarchist, who said, “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.”

His/her desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment, to have a great time and lighten up the world.

A Jester brand, and associated digital customer experience, wants us all to lighten up, have fun, and stop worrying about consequences. But it also celebrates cleverness used to trick others, get out of trouble, and find ways around obstacles, and live life experienced in the moment, one day at a time.

The Jester is a promising archetype to shape digital customer experiences for brands whose function helps people have a good time, with pricing that is moderate to low, produced and/or sold by a company with a fun-loving, freewheeling organizational culture.

Archetypes deeply influence also people’s behavior while at work. In a Jester organization, you can be ostracized if you have no sense of humor, just like in many Lover organizations, the unspoken rule is that everyone knows everything about everyone else.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Gamification Neosperience Neuromarketing Branding Archetypes Storytelling

The Lover Voice Within

lover

Whatever brand archetype your company chooses, all its efforts have to support that brand’s message and deliver a digital customer experience consistently.

Brands, with their deeper iconic value, were valuable because of the intangible meanings they offered. In this environment, companies that confuse their brand identity, such as Levi’s or Nike, find that distorting their archetypal images resulted in decreasing sales and profits.

Continuing the analysis performed so far, the Lover brand and digital customer experience archetype governs all forms of human love. Symbols of this archetype — whose key message is: “You are the only one” — include Sophia Loren, Clark Gable, Elizabeth Taylor, chocolates, Haagen Dazs and romance novels.

The Lover aids us in becoming attractive to others and also helps us develop skills of emotional and sexual intimacy.

Lover brands are common in the cosmetics, jewelry, fashion and automotive. Companies that choose, or were chosen by, this positioning include Alfa Romeo, Haagen-Dazs and Chanel. FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) picked up on this with an ad that states, “Without a soul, there’s just a shell. Without passion, these would just be cars.”

Customers with a highly developed Lover archetype like being singled out for attention. They like digital notices “to our special customers” announcing a sale that has not yet been announced to other customers. They like a digital customer experience app who knows their name and asks about them.

Lovers may also be known as partners, friends and matchmakers. The Lover is a promising identity for your brand and the customer experience you provide if your products represent either intimacy or elegance, help people find love or friendship, foster beauty and are moderately priced to expensive.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Neosperience Automotive Branding Archetypes Storytelling

Master Storytelling To Make Your Digital Customer Experience Stand Out

Storytelling

Long before we started talking about digital customer experience, actually long before the first formal business was established, before the first deal was made, the single most powerful sentence in any language was, “Let me tell you a story.”

Throughout human history, storytelling has been used to communicate the most sacred truths of the collective human experience.

Storytelling is the oldest and most effective form of communication. People tell stories to justify war, inspire passion, ignite romance and, to marketers’ purpose, to change the course of businesses’ history.

Today, corporations have been transformed into brands, which, in turn, are mirrors and shapers of society; and as markets have become conversations and brands are publishers, your customer has become the storyteller.

Every relevant story you hear is a variation on several archetypal plot lines. The best way to make your brand message and customer experience stand out is to use archetypical story themes derived from the experience of the whole mankind.

You can easily recognize Harley-Davidson’s outlaw riders as modern Robin Hoods. And wasn’t Apple just another warrior-like David attempting to defeat a Goliath-like Microsoft by offering the world a superior user experience? You can wear a pair of Nike shoes without knowing that Nike was the mythological Greek goddess of victory, but having linked the Nike brand to a well-known myth is a strategy that worked.

Thanks to ubiquitous smartphone and tablets, you can strengthen your digital customer experience by leveraging technology to tell a powerful story just by learning basic storytelling techniques and crafting them to fit your message.

To properly embed storytelling in your digital customer experience you have to master these 12 elements:

  1. Explain origins – Origin myths or stories exist in every culture and, at a smaller scale, in every organization. Go back in time and answer the question: where do my company and products come from?
  2. Define individual and group identity – Look for stories that define how the individual customer relates to your products or to your company as a whole, and look for archetypal foundations for that experience in traditions and folklore.
  3. Use sound and language to strengthen brand identification – Brands, which once primarily relied on visual elements (logos, signs), must now rely both on sound and language to strengthen brand identification, must use better and more precise writing styles, so for many companies it’s time to replace old fashioned communications managers with creative writers who have a better command of language and are not dominated by corporate processes.
  4. Make your brand a club that people aspire to join — a club whose philosophy your customers share, a place where they can go to be themselves and to meet other like-minded people, and an opportunity to talk and share their stories.
  5. Make your story interesting – Interesting words make for compelling stories and conversations. Well-crafted stories that convey trust and reliability become the narrative medium of a very positive bonding experience between your customer and your product. In an increasing frantic modern world, trust is a valuable commodity, as is reliability. A product that reliably makes the customer’s life easier is the trump card when customers are deciding between competing brands.
  6. Simplify and provide perspective – Stories boil complicated dilemmas down to a list of easy-to-understand precepts. Myths transform complicated themes into easily understandable stories.
  7. Illustrate the natural order of things – The gods on Mount Olympus understood who was in charge. Today, organizational charts accomplish the same task in your company.
  8. Concisely communicate complex history – Facts relayed in story form are much easier to understand and assimilate.
  9. Communicate moral and ethical positions – Stories relay values and help them endure. Cultures use stories to reinforce values and ethical behavior. Link the use of your product to these values.
  10. Illustrate relationships to and with authority – What happens to those who offend the person in charge? Look back to Greek myths to find out what gruesome fate awaits them.
  11. Describe appropriate responses to life – These stories tell your customers the benefits they will gain.
  12. Define rewards, and detail the paths to salvation and damnation – What happens when you sell your soul to the devil? Look no further than Lancelot’s quest for the Holy Grail or the creation of Frankenstein and ground your gamification strategy on this.

To tell your company’s story, internally or externally, keep the following in mind:

  • Storytelling provides the deepest connection between two people, between teller and listener, write and reader, your brand and your customer.
  • Stories are the ways we make sense of the world and stories give meanings to brands. The challenge for your, like for any brand, is to gain effortless recognition of and identification with its values.
  • All economic culture now needs to be about seduction.
  • Give your story a human face: customers and employees respond to stories about people.
  • Be accurate about your history. It’s okay to embellish, but tell honestly the truth.
  • Know your audience. In addition to employees, customers, it might include media, investors, your other stakeholders or your competition.
  • Be crystal clear and don’t assume your audience is familiar with your story or even cares to hear it.
  • Choose a technology partner that can help you in defining the most relevant use cases, business value, and shape an effective and proven digital customer experience to deliver an immediate and long lasting business benefit.

We’ve entered the Age of the Customer — an era where a focus on customers matters more for you than any other strategic imperative. If you want to be more effective in the way you engage with your customers, you need to tune in to their imaginations.

Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Future Neosperience Analytics Branding Archetypes Storytelling Inbound Marketing

How The Regular Guy/Girl Brand Archetype Once Saved The World

regular_guy

The Regular Guy/Girl brand archetype celebrates our virtues of being ordinary. Companies that identify with this positioning include MetLife, Ikea and VISA. It represents the a good identity for brands whose goal is to give people a sense of belonging, showing as the good old guy/girl, the everyman, the person next door.

This archetype might be a good fit for your brand and digital customer experience if your company has a homey appeal and your product helps people feel that they belong, is in daily use and is priced moderately to inexpensively.

As all other brand characters analyzed so far, the Regular Guy/Girl mediates between products and customer motivation by providing an intangible experience of meaning.

When you, as a marketer, brand your digital customer experience with an archetype, you give yourself a wonderful opportunity to define your company’s mission. Once you find, or establish, your corporate archetype, you will be able to help your company understand its cultural roots, teach your colleagues how to succeed within its culture and organize better collaborations among teams.

To follow up in this process, ask some questions about your company: what is your company’s name and what does it mean? What do your logos and payoff symbolize? How do your colleagues dress and behave? What does your office layout represent — for example, a high-tech startup, a library, a ship, or a waiting room — and what does that say about your unconscious corporate culture? What is your company’s deep structural goal?

Answering those questions moves you toward creating a winning brand identity and a winning future for your company and your customers’ digital experiences.

There are going to be seven billion smartphones in everybody’s hands in the next five years. Now, everybody is a digital customer, so doing things digitally is no longer a niche. Doing things digitally is how the entire world communicates. Angela Ahrendts, former Burberry’s CEO, Head of Retail Apple since mid-2014 .

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Branding Archetypes

How The Magician Archetype Can Create Your Digital Customer Experience

yoda

Archetypes are the strange attractors of consciousness. You attract customers when your message is congruent with a brand and digital customer experience archetype that is either dominant or emerging in their consciousness.

Among these, the Magician believes in understanding the rules and using them to accomplish specific goals. He has traditionally been the shaman and is at the forefront of great scientific changes. Star Wars’ Yoda, but also Mary Poppins, well represent this archetype.

His identity might be good for your brand and digital customer experience if your product or service is transformative as its promise is to transform the customer, it is user-friendly, it helps to expand or extend consciousness and it is priced in the medium to expensive range.

The most famous Magician in Western culture is Merlin, who looks in his crystal ball and predicts the potential for Camelot. His motto today could be: getting things done!

Entrepreneurs are often magical, as are athletes. Spiritual ideas linking inner consciousness with outer performance are yielding miraculous results in the business and sports worlds. Magical people often have dreams that other people see as impossible, yet it is the essence of magic to have a vision and then walk right into it.

To them, consciousness precedes existence: when things go wrong, magicians look inward to change themselves, rather then trying to change the world outside.

The most consistent images associated with this character are signs in the heavens — rainbows, shooting stars, a galaxy, flying saucers — which tend to reassure us that we are not alone in the universe. Other images include caves, crystal balls, magic wands, capes, and, of course, the magician’s tall, pointed hat.

This archetype is very strong in charismatic politicians, business leaders, and, in fact, the whole field of marketing, trading as it does on the influence of human consciousness on behavior.

Customers are dazzled by digital experiences that are enjoyable, innovative, and contextual. How are you going to keep up?

Being inspired by this archetype, you can plan, implement and deliver continuously evolving experiences in the age of the customer:

  1. Start defining your DCX most important use cases, business value, and outlook for the most relevant digital customer experience technologies, to deliver an immediate and long lasting business benefit; follow the the 7 steps digital customer experience checklist.
  2. Provide your customers with a real-time, connected global marketplace — in which they can interact with other people and your brand — with any of their devices, starting from smartphone and tablet.
  3. Allow them to do all these things easily and with any of their devices, seamlessly syncing their digital customer experience through their own personal cloud.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Neosperience Branding Archetypes

Why The Outlaw Brand Archetype Is More Sexy Than The Regular Guy?

outlaw

Linking your brand identity and digital customer experience to an archetype has helped properly shape the message of companies in the for-profit and non-profit sectors, delivering tangible benefits using this intangible concept.

Following up with the analysis performed so far, we find three transformative archetypes that represent change, using their energies to transform or destroy rigid and archaic structures: the Hero, the Outlaw and the Magician.

The Outlaw’s motto: Rules are made to be broken. Outlaw figures include Zorro, Robin Hood, Jack Nicholson. Another great example of a person and brand based on this archetype is Madonna. By acting in a sexually liberated way while wearing a cross and the name of the Virgin, Madonna’s brand identity has challenged the historical distinction between the Innocent virgin and the whore.

Such a brand identity requires a capacity for risk. It can be wildly successful if the society is ready for its values to be challenged. But can also generate backlash, criticism, and shaming if society is not ready and the challenge is posed too early.

In its essence, this archetype acts as a disruptive force, violating cultural norms and rules for the good of others (like Robin Hood), for adventure and personal gain (like Bonnie and Clyde), or out of desperate alienation (like Thelma and Louise).

Diesel, Harley-Davidson, but also the Internet as a whole have an outlaw image. This image can fit your brand well if your customers and employees feel disaffected from society, the function of your product is to destroy something. All restricted substances  like cigarettes and alcohol — have an Outlaw attraction for the young. And, of course, illegal substances have even more such appeal, which is why so many young people experiment with illegal drugs, learning only later that their impact is hardly glamorous.

It is important that we recognize, as Freud did, that Thanatos (the death wish) is about as strong as Eros (the life force).

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Branding Archetypes

The Hero Within Your Brand

hero.001

If you shape your digital customer experience today without paying attention to your brand meaning and archetype, then you are comparable to an ancient navigator trying to find his way on the seas during a starless night.

Archetypes can give your marketing strategy a compass, or a deeper meaning. Finding meaning and shaping your digital interactions with customers in a coherent way implies more than just borrowing an image; it means actually becoming completely consistent with the archetypal image that you believe your company represents.

Not only will your company create more effective customer experiences and customer journeys using archetype-based branding methods, but you will also gain a better understanding of your products and target customers.

Triumphing over adversity and evil: John Kennedy, John Wayne, all superheroes are heroes. Brands include Nike, Tah Heuer, the Olympics, the Red Cross. Wearing Nikes, in example, is aspirational: customers wear them not necessarily because they have the qualities of heroism, but because they want to have those qualities.

This identity might be right for your brand if you offer an invention or innovation that will have a major impact on the world. Your company might fit this archetype if your product helps people reach their upper limit, if you are addressing a major social problem and if your customer base identifies itself as moral and good.

Images associated with the hero archetype includes natural terrain requiring skill and agility; machines and offices where things are getting done; horses, cars, planes, people, or anything moving fast; and anything powerful, hence strong colors and definitive lines and shapes.

Discover also:

  1. The Innocent: Life does not have to be hard, this myth promises.
  2. The Explorer: Don’t fence me in.
  3. The Sage: Sharing wisdom with you.
  4. The Hero: Triumphing over adversity and evil.
  5. The Outlaw: Rules were meant to be broken.
  6. The Magician: The shaman at the forefront of great scientific changes.
  7. The Regular Guy/Girl: The virtues of being ordinary.
  8. The Lover: Intimacy and elegance.
  9. The Jester: To live in the moment with full enjoyment, having fun, and stop worrying about consequences.
  10. The Caregiver: The altruist, moved by compassion, generosity and a desire to help others.
  11. The Creator: Helping you be you (only better).
  12. The Ruler: Queens, kings, CEO’s, presidents, or anyone with power represents the ruler.
Topics: Digital Customer Experience Society Branding Archetypes

20-Years History Of The Most Heard Sound Logo

sound_logo

A sound logo is a trademark where sound is used to perform the function of uniquely identifying the commercial, archetypical origin of products or services.

This post and video is Neosperience homage to Nokia. Its ringtone has been the most heard sound logo, surpassing 1 billion times every day around the world.

The video shows how the Nokia sound logo evolved throughout the years:

  • 1994 - Nokia sound logo is spotted as the ringtone of the first ever mobile phone ad, a phrase from a composition for solo guitar, Gran Vals, by the Spanish classical guitarist and composer Francisco Tárrega, written in 1902.
  • 1999 - Here we have the Nokia tune in his rough monophonic version featured in the Nokia 3310, one of the best selling mobile phones in history.
  • 2003 - The 3510 upgrades the sound to be polyphonic Midi.
  • 2005 - The sound logo evolves as Nokia introduce mp3 ringtones in high-end devices like the 9500 Communicator.
  • 2007 - Reflecting the “connecting people” brand positioning and the new trend of the time, with the advent of the N95 Nokia sound logo becomes more human, musical and holistic.
  • 2011 - Nokia N9 introduces a new pure and minimalistic direction. The sound logo evolves into a more functional direction.

Nokia sound logo will be remembered as the signature of a great company that changed the world before the advent of iPhone and Android devices as we know them today, and that didn’t manage to adapt to a new world.

Thank you for the magic, Nokia. We at Neosperience will always be grateful to you as the company that gave birth to our professional history.

And thanks to the many remarkable people with whom we had the privilege to pave the way for the biggest business ecosystem in history.

Topics: Society Branding Archetypes Sound